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Southern African Customs Union Agreement 2002

The Ministry of Trade and Industry (DTI) highlighted the context, the 2002 SACU Agreement, the decisions of the Heads of State and Government, the objectives of the Annex, the role of the Summit and the procedural and legal implications. South Africa was a signatory to SACU, the world`s oldest customs union since its inception in 1910. That is where the 1969 agreement was born, after its examination. The SACU agreement was implemented on 15 July 2004, after being renegotiated and signed in 2002. A secretariat, hosted by Namibia, was established in 2004. The first meeting of SACU Heads of State and Government had taken place on 22 April 2010 and it had been decided at that meeting that SACU should have a summit and that it would be the highest decision-making body that would provide political and strategic guidance. The Annex to the Summit on Institutionalisation was developed and adopted by the Council in 2012 and signed by Heads of State and Government at a meeting in Botswana in 2013. The aim of the summit was to facilitate cross-border trade in goods between Member States` territories and to create effective, transparent and democratic institutions guaranteeing fair trade benefits. The main objective of the Annex was to provide for the establishment of the Summit as an additional SACU institution within the meaning of Article 8(8) of the 2002 SACU Convention.

The main task of the summit was to give SACU political and strategic direction. The proposed amendments were explained to the Committee and the procedural and legal implications of the annex were highlighted. On 5 November 2702, the United States and the countries of the South African Customs Union (SACU) – Botswana, Lesotho, Namibia, South Africa and Swaziland – announced that they would enter into negotiations for a free trade agreement. This agreement would build on the economic relations supported under the U.S. African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) of 2000. The Chairperson formally read the Committee`s agreement on the annex to the institutionalisation of SACU. The agreement was adopted unanimously by the Committee. Annex to the Institutionalisation of the South African Customs Union (SACU) Summit Ms Xolelwa Mlumbi-Peter, Deputy Director General of the Ministry of Trade and Industry (DTI), presented to the Committee the Annex to the Institutionalisation of the SACU Summit and highlighted the context, the 2002 SACU Agreement, the decisions of the Heads of State and Government, the objectives of the Annex, the role of the summit and the procedural and legal implications.

South Africa was a signatory to the Southern African Customs Union (SACU), the world`s oldest customs union since 1910. After verification, the 1969 agreement was born. The SACU agreement was then renegotiated and signed in 2002 and entered into force on 15 July 2004. The highest decision-making institution of the 2002 agreement was the Council of Ministers. In 2004, it had established a secretariat organized by Namibia. The first meeting of SACU Heads of State and Government was held on the 22nd At this meeting, the Heads of State and Government decided that SACU should have a summit that would be the highest decision-making body and that there would be political and strategic orientations. The annex to the institutionalisation of the summit was developed and adopted by the Council in 2012 and signed by the Heads of State and Government at a meeting in Botswana in 2013. The objective of the summit was to facilitate cross-border trade in goods between the territories of the Member States; create effective, transparent and democratic institutions that guarantee Member States fair trade advantages; promoting a level playing field in the common customs area; significantly increase investment opportunities in the common customs area; improving the economic development, diversification, industrialisation and competitiveness of the Member States; promote the integration of Member States into the world economy by strengthening trade and investment; facilitate a fair distribution of revenues from Member States` customs duties, excise duties and additional levies; and to facilitate the development of common policies and strategies. . .

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